Find the Poverty Rate in your State and Locality

The American Community Survey (ACS) finds a 2011 child poverty rate of 22.5%. Analysis by the Carsey Institute reveals this is higher than last year and continues to include the youngest children. Of the estimated 16.4 million children living in poverty, 6.1 million are under age six. Overall ACS reports a 2011 poverty rate of 15.9%, a .6% increase from last year, the fourth consecutive increase. Following the release of national 2011 data last week, the Census today released state, county, metro area, and Congressional district data. Both sets of information reveal income, poverty and health insurance coverage, but today’s data is from a different survey and also reveals the nuanced contexts across the country.

Notably, ACS reveals the number and percentage of people in poverty increasing in 17 states and remaining steady in 27. Young adults’ health insurance coverage increased in 37 states and no state experienced a decrease. Mississippi has the lowest median household income at $36,919 while Maryland has the highest at $70,004.

Today’s Census data comes from the annual American Community Survey that asks 3.5 million people about their demographics, family and relationships, income and benefits, education status, work life and more. The Census provides thousands of detailed tables at American FactFinder. In addition, they are releasing a variety of topic briefs over the next couple of months, including three today on income, poverty and health insurance. Additional data releases will follow in late October and early December, covering smaller geographic areas and comparing increasing numbers of years. For a user-friendly, interactive map of today’s poverty data, see Half in Ten.

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